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Corps Logistic Command
Legerkorps Logistiek Commando (LLC)

Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Operational Role | Forward Storage Sites | Reorganisations 1984-1990s


LLC612 Matvzgpel Leop 2721 Matvzggp Ama502 Matvzgpel PRTL511 Matvzgpel LtluaMagncplx 201 Vzgco611 Matvzgpel Leop 2513 Matvzgpel Ltlua711 Matvzgpel M109503 Matvzgpel PRTL602 Matvzgpel Leop 1V601 Matvzgpel Leop 1V512 Matvzgpel Ltlua722 Matvzggp Ama501 Matvzgpel PRTLStstcie LLC

Unit Location Peace Strength War Strength
Staff and Staff Company
Corps Logisic Command [a]
Ermelo 48/48/59/3 (158)
80/77/188 (345)

601 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 1V [b] Vierhouten 1/7/21 (29) 1/7/24 (32)
602 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 1V [c] 1/7/24 (32)
 
611 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 2 [d] Seedorf (GE) 1/7/24 (32) 1/7/23 (31)
612 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 2 [e] 1/7/23 (31)
    
501 Materiel Support Platoon PRTL [f] Ede 1/12/27 (40) 1/12/29 (42)
502 Materiel Support Platoon PRTL [g] 't Harde 1/9/20 (30) 1/12/29 (42)
503 Materiel Support Platoon PRTL [h] Hohne (GE) 1/8/19 (28) 1/12/29 (42)
   
511 Materiel Support Platoon Light Antiaircraft Artillery [i] -/4/10 (14)
512 Materiel Support Platoon Light Antiaircraft Artillery [i] -/4/10 (14)
513 Materiel Support Platoon Light Antiaircraft Artillery [i] -/4/10 (14)

711 Materiel Support Platoon M109 [j] -/3/11 (14)

721 Materiel Support Team Artillery Survey Battalion [k] 't Harde -/2/3 (5) -/2/4 (6)
722 Materiel Support Team Artillery Survey Battalion [l] Ede -/2/3 (5) -/2/4 (6)

Warehouse Complex 201 Support Command [m] Emstek (GE) 1/26/8 (35) -/11/- (11)

Notes

a. In wartime Commander, Corps Logistic Command was dual-hatted as Commander, Corps Rear Area. The staff and staff company included a Rear Area section (sectie achtergebied) (mobilisable) (14/12/12 (38)) which comprised a command group, a tactical operations/intelligence bureau, a CIMIC bureau, an engineer/NBC bureau, a traffic bureau and a Royal Military Constabulary bureau.1 
b. Formed in September 1985. Wartime organisation; under command of 103 Corps Repair Company in peacetime.
c. Formed in September 1985. Probably filled by mobilisable personnel that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 601 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 1V.2
d. Wartime organisation. Peacetime organisation: under direct command of 41 Armoured Brigade in June 1985, by December 1985 placed under the command of 41 Brigade Repair Company, 41 Armoured Brigade. 
e. Formed in September 1985. Probably filled by mobilisable personnel that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 611 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 2.2
f. Wartime organisation; under command of 131 Corps Repair Company in peacetime.
g. Wartime organisation; under command of 113 Corps Repair Company in peacetime.
h. Wartime organisation. Peacetime organisation: under direct command of 41 Armoured Brigade in June 1985, by December 1985 placed under the command of 125 Repair Company (Corps)41 Armoured Brigade.
i. Formed in September 1985. Likely filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.2 Would support the three light antiaircraft artillery battalions of 101 Antiaircraft Artillery Group.
j. Likely filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.2
k. Formed in September 1985. Wartime organisation; under command of 113 Corps Repair Company in peacetime. Supported 101 Artillery Survey Battalion, 1 (NL) Corps Artillery.
l Formed in September 1985. Wartime organisation; under command of 527 Electronic Central Workshop, National Logistic Command in peacetime. Supported 101 Artillery Survey Battalion1 (NL) Corps Artillery. 
m. Formed in January 1986. Peacetime organisation; under command of 201 Support Command in wartime.



Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Operational Role | Forward Storage Sites | Reorganisations 1984-1990s

14 LkhrstcieStstdet 54 Lkvzgbat 125 Hrstcie Lkvzgbat 54 Lkhrstcie Ststdet 114 Lkvzgbat 54 Bevocie Lkvzgbat 54 Lkvzgbat14 Gnkcie14 Bevocie Lkvzgbat44 Gnkcie44 Bevocie Lkvzgbat 44 Lkhrstcie 114 Lkvzgbat54 GnkcieStstdet 111 Lkvzgbat111 Lkvzgbat

111 Corps Support Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
111 Corps Support Battalion [a]

6/8/26/2 (42)
14 Supply Company (Corps) [b] 5/15/128 (148)
14 Corps Repair Company [c] Nieuw-Milligen 7/45/151 (203) 6/45/166 (217)
14 Medical Company [d] 16/18/104/2 (140)
   
114 Corps Support Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
114 Corps Support Battalion 
[a]
6/8/26/2 (42)
44 Supply Company (Corps) [e] 5/15/128 (148)
44 Corps Repair Company [f] Grave 4/31/98 (133) 6/44/109 (159)
54 Corps Repair Company [g] 6/45/178 (229)
44 Medical Company [h] 16/18/104/2 (140)

54 Corps Support Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
54 Corps Support Battalion 
[a]

6/8/26/2 (42)
54 Supply Company (Corps) [i] 5/15/128 (148)
125 Repair Company (Corps) [j] Hohne (GE) 6/38/115 (159) 8/41/151 (200)
54 Medical Company [k] 16/18/104/2 (140)

Notes

a. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3
b. Filled by mobilisable personnel that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 41 Brigade Supply Company up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3
c. Wartime organisation; under command of 101 Materiel Support Battalion in peacetime.
d. RIM company until mid-1985, filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 42 Brigade Medical Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation. After mid-1985 the company lost its RIM status, retaining the same personnel until 1990.3 31
e. Filled by mobilisable personnel that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 43 Brigade Supply Company up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3
f. Wartime organisation; under command of 109 Materiel Support Battalion in peacetime.4 Disbanded in September 1985.5 The company had a detachment in Hohne (GE), which became the core of the newly formed 125 Repair Company (Corps).4
g. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 14 Corps Repair Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31 Under command of 54 Corps Support Battalion in July 1985, by December 1985 under command of 114 Corps Support Battalion. This change probably went into effect per September 1985, following the disbandment of 44 Corps Repair Company and the formation of 125 Repair Company (Corps).6
h. RIM company until mid-1985, filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 43 Brigade Medical Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation. After mid-1985 the company lost its RIM status, retaining the same personnel until 1990.3 31
i. Filled by mobilisable personnel that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 43 Brigade Supply Company up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3 6 
j. Formed in September 1985.7 Wartime organisation; under command of 41 Armoured Brigade in peacetime.
k. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 44 Medical Company (RIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3 31



Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Operational Role | Forward Storage Sites | Reorganisations 1984-1990s

Ststdet 102 Avplbat501 AvplbatStstdet 501 Avplbat166 Wktrcie130 Munavplcie201 Gemavplcie117 Algbevodncie258 Avplbat123 Hlppel Kl III102 Avplbat103 AvplbatStstdet 258 Avplbat116 AlgbevodncieStstdet 103 Avplbat136 Wktrcie113 Algbevodncie115 Algbevodncie146 Wktrcie186 Wktrcie256 Exploprplg111 Gemavplcie149 Munavplcie102 Exploprplg112 Gemavplcie129 Munavplcie101 Exploprplg139 Munavplcie121 Gemavplcie

102 Supply Point Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
102 Supply Point Battalion
Ermelo 5/8/17 (30)
8/11/31/2 (52)
121 Mixed Supply Point Company Ermelo 6/23/135 (164) 10/36/270 (316)
139 Ammunition Supply Point Company Harskamp 6/22/99 (127) 6/25/155 (186)
101 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team [a] 1/2/6 (9)
115 General Supply and Services Company Ermelo 5/14/76 (95) 7/24/139 (170)
146 Labour Company Ermelo 5/14/113 (132) 5/17/164 (186)
   
103 Supply Point Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
103 Supply Point Battalion
Stroe 5/8/17 (30)
8/11/31/2 (52)
112 Mixed Supply Point Company Stroe 6/23/135 (164) 10/36/270 (316)
129 Ammunition Supply Point Company Stroe 6/22/99 (127) 6/25/155 (186)
102 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team [a] 1/2/6 (9)
113 General Supply and Services Company Stroe 5/14/76 (95) 7/24/139 (170)
186 Labour Company [b] 5/17/165 (187)

258 Supply Point Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
258 Supply Point Battalion [c]

8/11/31/2 (52)
111 Mixed Supply Point Company [d] 10/36/269 (315)
149 Ammunition Supply Point Company [e] 6/25/154 (185)
256 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team [a] 1/2/6 (9)
116 General Supply and Services Company [f] 7/24/141 (172)
136 Labour Company [g] 5/17/165 (187)

501 Supply Point Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
501 Supply Point Battalion [h]

8/11/31/2 (52)
201 Mixed Supply Point Company [i] 10/36/269 (315)
130 Ammunition Supply Point Company [j] 6/25/154 (185)
117 General Supply and Services Company [k] 7/24/141 (172)
166 Labour Company [g] 5/17/165 (187)

123 Service Platoon Class III [l] Stroe 1/2/16 (19) 1/6/31 (38)

Notes

a. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to twelve and a half years prior to mobilisation.3
b. RIM company, filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 146 Labour Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
c. GRIM unit, largely filled by mobilisable subunits that had fulfilled their active-duty period in Staff and Staff Detachment, 103 Supply Point Battalion between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
d. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 112 Mixed Supply Point Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
e. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 129 Ammunition Supply Point Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
f. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 113 General Supply and Services Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
g. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 186 Labour Company (RIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3 31
h. GRIM unit, largely filled by mobilisable subunits that had fulfilled their active-duty period in Staff and Staff Detachment, 102 Supply Point Battalion between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
i. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 121 Mixed Supply Point Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
j. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 139 Ammunition Supply Point Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
k. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 115 General Supply and Services Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
l. Wartime organisation; under command of 103 Supply Point Battalion in peacetime. This pipeline platoon was able to put into operation an Emergency Offtake Point (EOP) in the NATO Central Europe Pipeline System (CEPS) within twelve hours. There were three (inconspicuous) EOPs in the 1 (NL) Corps sector. The platoon could further provide general assistance in fuel supply operations.



Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Operational Role | Forward Storage Sites | Reorganisations 1984-1990s

Ststdet 124 MatvzgbatStstdet 109 Matvzgbat109 Matvzgbat124 Matvzgbat115 Lkhrstcie131 Lkhrstcie105 Matbevocie590 Baltechadvplg [590 BTA]106 Matbevocie119 Parkcie145 Lkhrstcie Wvtgn135 Lkhrstcie Wvtgn106 Bergcie111 Lkhrstcie Eltromat110 Lkhrstcie Eltromat110 GnhrstcieStstdet 101 Matvzgbat104 Matbevocie101 Matvzgbat125 Lkhrstcie113 Lkhrstcie103 Lkhrstcie

101 Materiel Support Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
101 Materiel Support Battalion
Nieuw-Milligen 7/10/15 (32)
7/11/28/2 (48)
103 Corps Repair Company Ermelo 7/43/139 (189) 6/45/162 (213)
113 Corps Repair Company 't Harde 8/53/165 (226) 7/52/176 (235)
125 Corps Repair Company [a] 6/44/154 (204)
104 Materiel Supply Company [b] 4/16/99 (119)
   
109 Materiel Support Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
109 Materiel Support Battalion
Naarden 7/10/15 (32)
7/11/28/2 (48)
110 Repair Company Electronic Equipment [c] Naarden 5/34/67 (106) 5/43/81 (129)
111 Repair Company Electronic Equipment [d] Harderwijk 5/50/65 (120) 5/60/82 (147)
110 Engineer Repair Company [e] Wezep 5/22/92 (119) 5/24/101 (130)
135 Corps Repair Company Wheeled Vehicles [f] 6/39/146 (191)
145 Corps Repair Company Wheeled Vehicles [g] 6/39/146 (191)
106 Materiel Supply Company [b] 4/16/103 (123)
106 Recovery Company Nieuw-Milligen 1/2/29/2 (34) 5/14/110 (129)
119 Field Park Company [b] 3/27/73 (103)
590 Ballistic Technical Advice Team [h] Nieuw-Milligen 1/2/2 (5) 1/2/2 (5)
   
124 Materiel Support Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
124 Materiel Support Battalion [i]

7/11/28/2 (48)
131 Corps Repair Company [j] Soesterberg 7/44/141 (192) 6/45/156 (207)
115 Corps Repair Company [k] 6/44/154 (204)
105 Materiel Supply Company [b] 4/16/103 (123)

Notes

a. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 113 Corps Repair Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
b. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3
c. Handled the repairs of all electronic equipment in use in 1 (NL) Corps such as radio, telephone and fire control equipment, as well as modern weapon systems such as the TOW antitank guided missile system. Disbanded in 1986 after these tasks had been distributed over other repair units within Corps Logistic Command.9 The company's personnel strengths given above are per December 1985; in July 1985 peacetime strength was 6/62/100 (168), wartime strength 6/94/135 (235).
d. Supported 101 Signal Group, handling the repairs of equipment used in the corps area communications system such as radio relay and telex equipment.9
e. Wartime organisation; under command of 101 Materiel Support Battalion in peacetime. Disbanded in 1986 after its engineer-specific repair capacity had been distributed over other repair units within Corps Logistic Command.10
f. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 131 Corps Repair Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
g. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 135 Corps Repair Company Wheeled Vehicles (GRIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.3 31
h. Wartime organisation; in peacetime falling under Materiel Test Division 1 (Materieelbeproevingsafdeling 1 (MBA 1)), Director of Materiel, Royal Army.
i. GRIM unit, largely filled by mobilisable subunits that had fulfilled their active-duty period in Staff and Staff Detachment, 101 Materiel Support Battalion between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31
j. Wartime organisation; under command of 109 Materiel Support Battalion in peacetime.
k. GRIM company, largely filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 103 Corps Repair Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.3 31



Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Operational Role | Forward Storage Sites | Reorganisations 1984-1990s

Ststdet 101 Aanvbatpers101 Aanvbatpers102 GnkgpGcieHcieEcieDcieFcieBcieAcieCcie105 Tbat828 AfvdetStstcie 105 Tbat832 Zwtcie829 Zwtcie110 Mzwtcie108 Lttcie107 Lttcie153 Zwtcie52 Lttcie49 Lttcie106 Lttcie

105 Transport Battalion
Staff and Staff Company
105 Transport Battalion
Vierhouten 8/12/28 (48)
7/12/32/2 (53)
49 Light Transport Company [a] [b] Vierhouten 5/17/92 (114) 5/16/141 (162)
52 Light Transport Company [a] [c] Tilburg 5/17/92 (114) 5/16/141 (162)
106 Light Transport Company [a] Vierhouten 5/17/92 (114) 5/16/141 (162)
107 Light Transport Company [a] Vierhouten 5/17/92 (114) 5/16/141 (162)
108 Light Transport Company [a] Vierhouten 5/17/92 (114) 5/16/141 (162)
110 Medium Transport Company [d] Vierhouten 5/17/97 (119) 5/16/128 (149)
828 Transport Detachment [e] Seedorf (GE) 2/5/50 (57) 1/5/50 (56)
829 Heavy Transport Company [f] [g] Raamsdonksveer 6/18/122 (146) 5/18/133 (156)
832 Heavy Transport Company [f] [h] Raamsdonksveer 1/3/41 (45) 6/22/168 (196)
153 Heavy Transport Company [f] [i] 5/17/127 (149)
   
101 Personnel Replacement Battalion [j]
Staff and Staff Detachment
101 Personnel Replacement Battalion
9/19/31/2 (61)
A Company 6/13/20 (39)
B Company 6/13/20 (39)
C Company 6/13/20 (39)
D Company 6/13/20 (39)
E Company 6/13/20 (39)
F Company 6/13/20 (39)
G Company 6/13/20 (39)
H Company 6/13/20 (39)
   
102 Medical Group Ermelo 37/53/264 (354) 555/616/3412/26 (4609)

Corps Logistic Command Peace Strength: 251/803/3002/5 (4061)
Corps Logistic Command War Strength: 1103/2374/11814/56 (15347)

Notes

a. Each light transport company had three platoons, each probably with 20 x three-tonne truck (DAF YA-314 or perhaps YA-328) and 1 x DAF YA-4440.11
b. Disbanded in 1986 to form 110 Medium Transport Company.
c. Wartime organisation; under command of Transport Training Centre in peacetime.
d. Formed in March 1986.
e. Wartime organisation. Peacetime organisation: under direct command of 41 Armoured Brigade in June 1985, by December 1985 placed under the command of 41 Brigade Supply Company, 41 Armoured Brigade.
f. In wartime the heavy transport companies would mainly handle transport of fuel and ammunition to the corps supply points. In 1985 these units began to receive ten-tonne trucks of the DAF YA-2300 series, which gradually replaced their six-tonne trucks of the DAF YA-616 series.12 
g. Referred to as 829/832 Heavy Transport Company in peacetime; see note h. In some documents the company carries the suffix '10t' (ten-tonne).Moved to Grave in 1986.12
h. This mobilisable company had one platoon on active duty, which was attached to 829 Heavy Transport Company in peacetime; see note g.12 GRIM company, largely filled out by one or more mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period as the active-duty platoon between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation, and probably by a platoon on Short Leave as well.3 31 In some documents the company's unit name carries the suffix 'POL' (Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants).3  
i. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to twelve and a half years prior to mobilisation. In some documents the company's unit name carries the suffix 'POL'.3
j. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to six and a half years prior to mobilisation.3

Operational Role

Corps Logistic Command oversaw the logistic operations within 1 (NL) Corps, both in peace and in wartime. The logistical support to 1 (NL) Corps was provided by National Logistic Command.13 The role of Corps Logistic Command comprised four basic logistic functions: supply, materiel support, transport and medical support.14 In wartime its main units would handle these functions as follows: 
  • Thirteen, mostly platoon-sized, equipment-specific materiel support modules (see Part I) would each support a specific corps unit: 601 Materiel Support Platoon Leopard 1V for instance would support 104 Reconnaissance Battalion. During operations the materiel support modules would be attached to the brigade or corps repair company in whose area they would operate.15 
  • Three corps support battalions (see Part II) would support those corps troops that had either been placed under the operational command of a division or had taken up positions in a divisional sector. They comprised the same logistic support elements as the logistically self-sufficient brigades: a supply company handling supply and general transport duties, a repair company performing both repair and materiel support tasks, and a medical company.16
  • Four supply point battalions (see Part III) would each establish and operate a corps supply point area in the field. 102 Supply Point Battalion would operate Corps Supply Point Area 5, 103 Supply Point Battalion would operate Corps Supply Point Area 6, and 258 and 501 Supply Point Battalion would operate Corps Supply Point Areas 4 and 7.17 From these four areas the supply companies of the brigades and the corps support battalions would replenish their supplies, as would the corps troops present in the Corps Rear Area. Each corps supply point area included separate supply points for Class I, Class III and Class V supplies. Apart from the self-evident role of the ammunition supply point companies the mixed supply point companies would handle Class I and III supplies, whilst the general supply and services companies would take care of Class II and IV supplies, provide bathing facilities and take care of burials. The labour companies would provide extra manpower, for example for loading ammunition.18
  • Three materiel support battalions (see part IV) were responsible for the supply, repair and withdrawal of a variety of equipment such as vehicles, weapons, tents, heaters, etc., as well as for the supply of spare parts. Within its area of responsibility each battalion would deploy supply points and field workshops on which the repair companies of the brigades and corps support battalions could fall back. In addition the battalions would support the corps troops in the Corps Rear Area.19
  • A transport battalion, a personnel replacement battalion and a medical group (see Part V) would perform their (self-explanatory) roles in support of 1 (NL) Corps.
The division, being a tactical level only, was not a level in the logistical chain. Corps Logistic Command was responsible for the execution of logistic operations in support of brigades and corps troops placed under divisional command. Within this framework units of Corps Logistic Command could be placed under (operational) command of the division.20

In wartime Commander, Corps Logistic Command would exert control over his area of operations as Commander, Corps Rear Area (see 
Part I, note a). <

Forward Storage Sites

The four corps supply point areas were to be (re)stocked from Forward Storage Sites (FStS) in the Corps Rear Area. The construction of FStS had begun in the late 1970s as part of a common-funded NATO project, but progress was slow.21 Out of nine planned FStS (Jesteburg, Töpingen, Wintermoor, Tostedt, Neuenkirchen, Seedorf, Sehlingen, Hellwege and Dünsen) only four were operational by the end of 1985: Töpingen, Sehlingen, Hellwege and Dünsen.22 This meant that two or three of the four corps supply point areas would still depend on vulnerable and time-consuming logistical build-up operations from military depots in the Netherlands. Notably, the three FStS from which the first-line Corps Supply Point Areas 5 and 6 would be stocked, Wintermoor, Tostedt and Neuenkirchen, had, through various circumstances, been moved to the rear of the realisation scheme. The two easternmost FStS, Jesteburg and Töpingen, served a somewhat different purpose: they would enable those units engaged in the covering force battle to replenish their fuel and ammunition supplies.23 The nine FStS together were eventually to store 35,500 tonnes of supplies, of which two thirds ammunition; enough to get 1 (NL) Corps through seven days of combat (fifteen standard days of supplies).24 In peacetime the FStS were manned by German civilian personnel and fell under National Logistic Command, in wartime they would be under the control of Corps Logistic Command.25 <


1 (NL) Corps Sector: Supply, 1985 26

 

Reorganisations 1984-1990s 27

Throughout the 1970s and 1980s the logistic services of the Royal Army underwent several reorganisations, which aimed to integrate the various logistical chains (such as supply, repair and materiel support) into one client-oriented logistic system. In the second half of the 1980s the focus shifted from supporting client units to supporting the operational role of those units: the integration of the logistical and tactical systems.28

Between 1984 and 1988 the materiel support services (materieeldienst) of the Royal Army were restructured in order to improve their capability to handle the maintenance of complicated weapon systems such as the PRTL self-propelled antiaircraft gun system, the YPR-765 series of infantry fighting vehicles and the Leopard 1V and Leopard 2 main battle tanks
.29 The brigade repair companies were reorganised to form weapon system-oriented repair teams, rather than being subdivided by service-oriented categories such as artillery, weapons and instruments. At corps level the repair companies of the corps support battalions (see Part II) and materiel support battalions (see Part III) were reorganised in a similar way. In addition to this separate equipment-specific materiel support modules were formed (see Part I).

In 1984 the Army Board (Legerraad) ordered the modernisation of the Class III and Class V
supply systems. The Class III supply system was obsolescent, vulnerable and lacked flexibility, with bulk fuel distribution limited to 10,000 liter semi-trailer tanker trucks (DAF YT-514) and individual distribution hinging on the use of jerrycans. The Class V supply system too had its limitations. Though by 1985 about ninety percent of ammunition had been palletised, the methods of its transshipment, by tractor cranes and by hand, remained inefficient and time-consuming. Moreover, brigade distribution points for ammunition had been left out of the supply chain in order to reduce the number of transshipments: client units had to pick up their ammunition from the ammunition supply points in the Corps Rear Area, up to a hundred kilometres to the rear. This meant long turnaround times and long supply lines vulnerable to congestion and enemy interdiction.

The modernised Class III and Class V supply systems would, roughly, work as follows:
  • Class III: new 20,000 liter semi-trailer tanker trucks (DAF YTV-2300) would handle fuel transports from CEPS depots to the fuel supply points and from there to brigade and corps distribution points, where new 4,000 liter fuel tanker trucks (DAF YF-4442) of client units would refill. The YF-4442s were able to directly tank up vehicles of client units. 
  • Class V: new twenty-tonne semi-trailer trucks (DAF YTV-2300 with roll loader crane) would transport ammunition from FStS to the ammunition supply points and from there to brigade and corps distribution points, where ten-tonne trucks (the new DAF YAZ-2300 with loader crane) and four-tonne trucks (DAF YA-4440 and the new YA-4442 series, a number of which with loader crane) of client units would pick up the ammunition.         
Apart from improving speed and efficiency both new systems would enable the dispersal of supplies, thus reducing vulnerability to enemy interdiction. As can be gathered from the above, the modernisations depended on the influx of new vehicles. The YAZ-2300 and YTV-2300 ammunition trucks began entering service from 1985, which allowed the new Class V supply system to be tested in 1988 during the 1 (NL) Corps Field Training Exercise (FTX) Free Lion. The results proved satisfactory, and the new Class V supply system became operational in 1989. At that time the new Class III supply system was still only partially operational, due to delays in the development of the YF-4442 fuel tanker truck. The first of these entered service as late as the early 1990s; the YTV-2300 semi-trailer tanker trucks meanwhile entered service from 1988.30

The corps medical support system, certainly as much in need of modernisation as the supply and materiel support services, would not see such a project begin until 1988. For an overview see 102 Medical Group, Organisational Obsolescence and Reorganisation 1988-1992.
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1. NL-HaNA 2.13.110, inv.nr. 179, Aantekeningen bij reorganisatie Ststcie LLC d.d. 2 november 1976. NL-HaNA, op. cit., Reorganisatie Ststcie LLC d.d. 14 februari 1977. NL-HaNA, op. cit., OTAS (organisatietabel en autorisatiestaat) Staf en stafcompagnie Legerkorps Logistiek Commando d.d. 7 december 1978. Given the dates of these documents the details of the Rear Area section may not be entirely correct for 1985; between 1978 and 1985 this organisation type's OTAS was altered twice (compare the organisation type numbers from NL-HaNa, op cit., 1978, and NIMH 430, inv. nr. 54 (Slagorde KL stand 1 juli 1985)). Wartime command over the Corps Rear Area had been assigned to Commander, Corps Logistic Command in 1977. NL-HaNA, op. cit., 1976, 1977. Somewhere between 1985 and 1987 this command was transferred to Commander, 101 Infantry Brigade and given the designation Rear Area Command (Commando Achtergebied, also more correctly referred to as Commando Legerkorpsachtergebied); see further 101 Infantry Brigade, footnote 3. CIMIC: civil-military cooperation. NBC: nuclear, biological, chemical. For the role of the Royal Military Constabulary in the Corps Rear Area, see 101 Military Constabulary Battalion, Operational Role
2. These units are not (yet) included in the 1985 filling schemes for mobilisable units and replacements. NIMH 205A/10, Aflossing van mobilisabele eenheden en -aanvullingen d.d. 17 juni 1985.
3. NIMH 205A/10, Aflossing van mobilisabele eenheden en -aanvullingen d.d. 27 mei 1980. Ibid., d.d. 11 november 1983. Ibid., d.d. 17 juni 1985.
4. Van Hoof en Roozenbeek, Grave, 149-150.
5. It appears the company was deactivated as of May 1984. Van Hoof en Roozenbeek, op. cit., 150.
6. The official Royal Army order of battle per December 1985 shows 54 Corps Repair Company under command of 54 Corps Support Battalion and 54 Supply Company (Corps) under command of 114 Corps Support Battalion. I hold this to be an error, as it would leave 114 Corps Battalion without a repair company and 54 Corps Support Battalion without a supply company. Moreover, both the preceding and following orders of battle show the regular 'train battalion' organisation with each corps support battalion having a repair, a supply and a medical company. NIMH 430, inv. nrs. 54, 55, 56, 57 (Slagordes KL stand 1 juli 1985, 23 december 1985, 1 juli 1986, 29 december 1986).
7. Prior to activation initially numbered 121 (121 Herstelcompagnie Legerkorpsverzorgingsbataljon). NIMH 430, inv. nr. 54 (Slagorde KL stand 1 juli 1985). Ibid., inv. nr. 55 (Slagorde KL stand 23 december 1985). Van Hoof en Roozenbeek, op. cit., 149. Woensel, 50 Jaar, 246. The choice for the number 125 seems peculiar as there was already a similar, mobilisable company with that number: 125 Corps Repair Company (125 Legerkorpsherstelcompagnie).
8. Roozenbeek, In dienst, 213. There were two CEPS depots in the 1 (NL) Corps sector, one near Breddorf and one at Farge. In addition there was a third CEPS depot close by in the I (GE) Corps sector, near Hodenhagen. See also the map above. 
9. Elands et al., Van telegraaf, 209-211.
10. Elands et al., 250 jaar, 243.
11. Website Geschiedenis Bevoorrading en Transport, 105 Transportbataljon.
12. Van Hoof en Roozenbeek, op. cit., 129-130, 153-154. See also Bremer, 829/832 Zware Transportcompagnie, 38. Bremer reports that 829/832 Heavy Transport Company had, apart from a number of tractor trucks (the new DAF YTV-2300 and the old DAF YT-616), ninety-six semi-trailers, both ten-tonne (with and without loader crane) and twenty-tonne (for peacetime ammunition transport), and further eighteen DAF YA-4440 four-tonne trucks, a number of Land Rovers and two tow trucks. Bremer, loc. cit. 
13. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, Met de blik, 299. Roos, Van marketentster, 335-336, 337.
14. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 408-411.
15. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 409. Roos, op. cit., 348. Between 1984 and 1988 a total of twenty-seven of these modules were formed. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, loc. cit. The modules formed after 1985 for example included materiel support platoons for specific units equipped with M110, MGM-52C Lance and YPR-765. NIMH 430, inv. nrs. 60 t/m 62 (Slagordes KL 1988).
16. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 311. Roos, op. cit., 342. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 212.
17. Roozenbeek , op. cit., 211.
18. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 311-312. Roos, op. cit., 342-343, 357. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 209-210. Military classes of supply - Class I: food, water; Class II: items included in a unit's Table of Organisation and Equipment (in the Royal Army: organisatietabel en autorisatiestaat (OTAS)) such as weapons, vehicles, tools, spare parts, individual equipment including clothing; Class III: petroleum, oil and lubricants (POL), paint and chemicals; Class IV: items a unit needs to perform a specific task but not falling under Class II, for instance construction materials or additional vehicles and weapons; Class V: ammunition, explosives. Roos, op. cit., 356. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 122. 
19. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 312. Roos, op. cit., 342. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 212.
20. Van den Doel, Divisiestaf, 526, 527. Cooke en Kroon, Materieeldienstorganisatie, 69, and subsequent discussion in Militaire Spectator nr. 5, 1986, 249, 251. Isby and Kamps, Armies, 323. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 169, 171. Roos, op. cit., 326. 
21. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 346. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 204-206. HTK 1982-1983, kamerstuknr. 17600 ondernr. 2, 18. See also 1 (NL) Corps, Maldeployment. 
22. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, loc. cit. Roozenbeek, loc. cit. The location names of the third and fourth FStS operational in 1985 were kindly provided by mr. H. Roozenbeek of the Netherlands Institute of Military History (NIMH) (email 02.11.2009). According to the initial planning all nine FStS were to be operational before 1985. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 346. By the end of 1988 five FStS were operational and one was partly operational; the three remaining sites were to be completed by 1992. HTK 1988-1989, kamerstuknr. 20800 ondernr. 19, 20. 
23. Roozenbeek, loc. cit. It was deemed possible to use the FStS as static supply points if needed; the sites did however not have the necessary layout for this, and as their locations were more or less common knowledge such operations would be highly vulnerable to enemy action. Ibid.
24. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, loc. cit. Roos, op. cit., 336. Apart from ammunition the FStS would also store fuel, combat rations, field fortification and bridging materials. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 204. In 1985 the expected ammunition consumption per combat day for 1 (NL) Corps was 2,300 tonnes, whilst the application of intensity factors meant that the entire supply system had to be able to handle a day consumption of  5,750 tonnes of ammunition. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 227.
25. Information kindly provided by mr. H. Roozenbeek of the Netherlands Institute of Military History (NIMH) (email 11.07.2013). The FStS are not included in the official orders of battle, presumably because there was no army personnel assigned to them; they were part of the military infrastructure rather than military units. NIMH 430, inv. nrs. 54 t/m 57 (Slagordes KL 1985-1986)In peacetime National Logistic Command probably exerted control over the FStS through the Staff and Staff Company of  201 Support Command in Emstek (GE).
26. NL-HaNA 2.13.182, inv. nr. 586, Bijlage B bij Rapport A1"Bulkbevo kl III goederen binnen 1 Lk" (1984). Roozenbeek, op. cit., 205. See also footnote 22.
27. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 408-411. Isby and Kamps, loc. cit. Roos, op. cit., 327, 346-347. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 169-170, 214-218, 224-229. 
28. Roos, op. cit., 351. In ibid., 289-361, co-author J.F.M. Leuring provides a both extensive and detailed history of the development and operational context of the Royal Army's logistic systems during the Cold War. In the summary (ibid., 349-354) which also comprises a critical analysis, he draws three main conclusions that are worth repeating here. Firstly, that logistical concepts set up during the 1950s, for example the reliance on jerrycans for fuel supply, were held on to for too long (i.e. into the 1980s) whilst tactical and operational concepts changed profoundly. Secondly, that command and control over the logistical chains supporting 1 (NL) Corps can be described as deficient: Corps Logistic Command was equivalent to a Corps Support Command (COSCOM) in the US Army (see also Isby and Kamps, loc. cit); however, a COSCOM was commanded at army level, which level did not exist in the Royal Army. Measures to fix this problem through liaisons between National Logistic Command, Corps Logistic Command and NORTHAG were inadequate (Roos, op. cit., 343). Leuring observes that both the command and control problem and the persistence of obsolescent logistical concepts may wel have stemmed from the fact that, in the early 1950s, the Royal Army had adopted the logistic structure of the US Army without, apparently, understanding the deeper reasonings behind that structure. To conclude, the author estimates that up to ± 1985 it would have been somewhat doubtful whether the logistic support to 1 (NL) Corps would have been satisfactory in wartime, and that from ± 1985 results would have been better thanks to the modernisation of logistical concepts.
29. When high-tech equipment began entering service in the late 1970s, the Royal Army's logistical structure proved unprepared. Maintenance and repair services were subdivided by specialism, such as vehicle technique, weapon technique, hydraulics, pneumatics and electronics. High-tech equipment however required a system-oriented approach in which such specialisms were integrated. The lack of an integrated approach resulted in long repair times and overall inadequate maintenance. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 359. The consequences of this became painfully clear in the early 1980s when the deployability of the PRTL self-propelled antiaircraft gun system had dropped far below acceptable levels, and later when the army's upgrading programme for the Leopard 1 main battle tank failed to successfully marry high-tech components to the low-tech vehicle. For an outline of the maintenance problems with the PRTL and their effects on operational readiness, see Unit Organisation and Equipment, The Armoured Antiaircraft Artillery Battery. For the problems with the Leopard 1 upgrading programme see for instance 13 Armoured Brigade, notes a, b and footnote 5.
30. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, op. cit., 410, 411. Roozenbeek, op. cit., 226-228. Of the YA-2300 series all in all about 1,500 vehicles were ordered. In 1985 the Royal army ordered 5125 trucks of the YA-4442 series, the first of which entered service in 1990. In that year 395 YF-4442 fuel tanker trucks were ordered. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, loc. cit.
31. RIM was the Dutch acronym for Direct Influx into Mobilisable Units (Rechtstreekse Instroming in Mobilisabele Eenheden). GRIM was a variant of this system, meaning "Largely RIM" (Grotendeels Rechtstreekse Instroming in Mobilisabele Eenheden). For a survey of the Royal Army's unit filling and reserve system see Gijsbers, Blik in de smidse, 2222-2231; Selles, Personele vulling; Berghuijs, Opleiding, 14-23. In English: Isby and Kamps, Armies, 341-343; Sorell, Je Maintiendrai: The Royal Netherlands Army within the Alliance, 94-96; Van Vuren, The Royal Netherlands Army TodayMilitary Review April 1982, 23-28.


Corps Supply Point Area 7Corps Supply Point Area 4Corps Supply Point Area 5Corps Supply Point Area 6FStS DünsenFStS HellwegeFStS SehlingenFStS Töpingen(FStS Seedorf)(FStS Jesteburg)(FStS Neuenkirchen)(FStS Tostedt)(FStS Wintermoor)CEPS Depot BreddorfCEPS Depot FargeCEPS Depot OldenburgCEPS Depot Hodenhagen